Nubes

 

Lo que creía que era montañas
demostrado ser

 

Skyer

 

Det jeg trodde var fjell
viste seg å være

 

Clouds

 

What I thought was mountains
proved to be

 

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Fredrik Hossmann
(21/30)

Puslespill

Puslespill

 

Livet mitt er et puslespill

hvor brikkene skapes

etter hvert som de trengs

 

akkurat nå holder jeg

på med en skyformasjon

i øvre venstre hjørne

 

Fredrik Hossmann

 

Fremtidens bøker – bøkenes fremtid

Et lite utvalg fra den digitale bokhyllen. Noen kan lastes ned som pdf, andre som dokument. Er det slik vi kommer til å lese bøker i fremtiden?

Lenge har det vært fildeling på internett når det gjelder tekst, bilder, musikk og film. Bøkene er det siste mediet til å følge etter over i den digitale verden.

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http://www.scribd.com/

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/3150636/David-Allen-Ready-for-Anything-52-Productivity-Principles-for-Work-and-Life

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/4449272/Eric-Tamm-Brian-Eno-His-Music-and-the-Vertical-Color-of-Sound

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/6851136/MCCARTHY-The-Road

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/49529/2-B-R-O-2-B-by-Kurt-Vonnegut

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/563567/Marriage-the-Relic

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http://www.scribd.com/doc/6391043/Charles-Bukowski-South-of-No-North

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Fredrik Hossmann

Four fragments from an unfinished life (for Alice)

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Wishing us all the best in our
days and nights
between slumbering  reality
and waking dreams
hours of timeless moments
minutes of eternity
seconds of endlessness

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I caress you in my love for her
as I caress her in the love
that flows through me and you

sometimes we are one body
consisting of us
and others we have yet to know

*

our existance brightens my life,
may it brighten yours and hers as well

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So nice to be alive in the same time
if not the same space

*

Published in: on 4 februar, 2009 at 20:29  Legg igjen en kommentar  

The empty space

«I can take any empty space and call it a bare stage. A man walks across this empty space whilst someone else is watching him, and this is all I need for an act of theatre to be engaged.»

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Peter Brook

Published in: on 1 november, 2008 at 1:33  Legg igjen en kommentar  
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Ten short poems and two variations

poems

i don´t read poems
they read me

soon they know me
by heart

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a ring of wind

I offer you a ring of wind

It is only you who knows
When you wear it

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it doesn´t matter

it doesn´t matter

that is why
it si so important

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as i am

if you want to see me
as I am

you must remember
that you are also a part of the picture

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love is not all

but without love
it is nothing

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here

here with us
you can be
as you are

only if you are
exactly as us

*

we

we can meet
because we are two

we can separate
because we are one

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the same in all languages
the silence between the words

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another voice
the same words
other words
yet the same voice

*

jigsawpuzzle

my life is a jigsaw puzzle
where the pieces are created
as they are needed

right now I am busy
with a flock of clouds
in the upper left corner

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two variations

me and you
are not all

but without us
there is no we

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the same in all houses
the space between the walls

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Fredrik Hossmann

The failed artist

There is nothing fiercer than the failed artist. The energy remains, but having no outlet, it implodes in a great black fart of rage which smokes up all the inner windows of the soul.

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Erica Jong

Published in: on 5 mai, 2008 at 4:46  Legg igjen en kommentar  
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Whatever we say, we agree

For years Lanois and fellow traveler Brian Eno have collaborated and produced a mindset and canon that goes to the core of the creative process. The central catalyst they established with each other early on is “Whatever I say, you agree and whatever you say, I agree.” Eno points out that nothing then stands in the way of getting on with the creative process. Once underway, magic eventually unfolds.

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Published in: on 5 april, 2008 at 1:50  Legg igjen en kommentar  
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The greatest wonder of all

The greatest wonder of all is that each day death strikes,
and we live as though we were immortal.

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Yudhisthira (from the Mahabharata)

Published in: on 13 februar, 2008 at 1:10  Legg igjen en kommentar  
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No country for old men (excerpt)

Here a year or two back me and Loretta went to a conference in Corpus Christi and I got set next to this woman, she was the wife of somebody or other. And she kept talking about the right wing this and the right wing that.

I aint even sure what she meant by it. The people I know are mostly just common people. Common as dirt, as the sayin goes. I told her that and she looked at me funny. She thought I was sayin something bad about em, but of course that’s a high compliment in my part of the world. She kept on, kept on.

Finally told me, said: I don’t like the way this country is headed. I want my granddaughter to be able to have an abortion. And I said well mam I don’t think you got any worries about the way the country is headed. The way I see it goin I don’t have much doubt but what she’ll be able to have an abortion. I’m goin to say that not only will she be able to have an abortion, she’ll be able to have you put to sleep. Which pretty much ended the conversation.

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Cormac McCarthy

Published in: on 10 februar, 2008 at 21:34  Legg igjen en kommentar  
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Writing is not…

«Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwards.»

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Robert Heinlein

Published in: on 7 desember, 2007 at 18:16  Legg igjen en kommentar  

To practice any art…

«To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it.»

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Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (1922-2007)

Published in: on 6 desember, 2007 at 18:12  Legg igjen en kommentar  

Old buildings are not ours

«When we build, let us think that we build for ever. Let it not be for present delight, nor for present use alone, let it be such work as our descendents will thank us for. And let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time is to come when those stones will be held sacred, because our hands have touched them, and that men will say as they look upon the labour and wrought substance of them, “see, this our fathers did for us?»

«For indeed, the greatest glory of a building is not in its stones, nor in its gold, its glory is in its age, and in that deep sense of voicefulness, or stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity. It is in that golden stain of time that we are to look for the real light and colour and preciousness of architecture?»

«Old buildings are not ours. They belong partly to those who built them, and partly to the generations of mankind who are to follow us.»

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John Ruskin

Published in: on 30 september, 2007 at 23:19  Legg igjen en kommentar  

Life after life

I’ve said it before to people who have a romanticized view of the artist and hold creation sacred: In the end, your art doesn’t save you. No matter what sublime works you fabricate (and Bergman gave us a menu of amazing movie masterpieces) they don’t shield you from the fateful knocking at the door that interrupted the knight and his friends at the end of “The Seventh Seal.” And so, on a summer’s day in July, Bergman, the great cinematic poet of mortality, couldn’t prolong his own inevitable checkmate, and the finest filmmaker of my lifetime was gone.

I have joked about art being the intellectual’s Catholicism, that is, a wishful belief in an afterlife. Better than to live on in the hearts and minds of the public is to live on in one’s apartment, is how I put it. And certainly Bergman’s movies will live on and will be viewed at museums and on TV and sold on DVDs, but knowing him, this was meager compensation, and I am sure he would have been only too glad to barter each one of his films for an additional year of life. This would have given him roughly 60 more birthdays to go on making movies; a remarkable creative output. And there’s no doubt in my mind that’s how he would have used the extra time, doing the one thing he loved above all else, turning out films.

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Woody Allen

Published in: on 14 august, 2007 at 1:43  Legg igjen en kommentar  

The Mysterious Ways of Arabic Music

(…)

Twenty minutes later and we’re seated with 2,000 others inside a beautiful walled garden, as Parissa and the five-piece Dastan Ensemble, begin their set on a low stage under the shade of two huge trees. Turns out the Ensemble are the most famous classical Iranian group in the world and they deliver a virtuoso performance on the kind of percussion and string instruments rarely played in the West. Parissa herself is a mesmerising Arabic soul singer, totally lost in the music, hands raised heavenward in mystic praise even though no-one has a clue what she’s singing about.

‘Teleological’ is the word Brian Eno later uses to describe this Arabic musical tradition. It has little in common with the ‘verse, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge…’ construction of western rock’n’roll heritage. For a start they’re not big on the idea of the hit single – the first track alone lasts forty five minutes.
‘Can you believe this?’ asks Bono, as the audience rises as one to salute them at the end of their two-song, 70-minute set. ‘Isn’t that something else ?’

‘Briefly,’ says Eno, explaining the peculiar distinction of the Arabic musical tradition, ‘You could say that African-based music is generally cyclic – ideas that go round and round in a fairly straightforward way – but Arabic music generally isn’t cyclic. It’s generally a sort of narrative in that it starts in one place and ends up in another place… the proper word is ‘teleological.’
Towards a finish?
‘Yes, it has a definite trajectory and a narrative to it and it doesn’t repeat in the same way that most African-based pop music does. So in a typical pop song you will have ‘A B A B A B C A B B’ or something like that but in Arabic music you might have ‘A B C F B G F’ or something like that.
‘Basically it just goes off and what we’ve been doing here these past few days is enjoying things like that more and more, moving away from the simply cyclic way of writing things.’
So you’re trying to create a different sensibility in the songwriting here? Well, he says, put it like this: ‘Whenever there was an aesthetic decision to be made we’ve asked, ‘How would it be solved in Arabic music?’ So that gives us another frame to think in – it doesn’t mean we always do what an Arabic player might have done but it gives us a different frame of reference.’

‘I’ve had this thing about Arabic music for ages, thinking that it’s where the next big future in fusion will come from – I’ve been saying that for about thirty years and finally I think it is coming true.
‘There are things I like a lot about Arabic music which are different to what we do in western music and so we have started trying to incorporate some of those elements. It is not a question of sounds so much but of different structural decisions about how things are made.’

So, if pushed, how far along the way does he feel they have got so far ? ‘There’ll be some differences of opinion about which things will constitute a record,’ he says. ‘But we have a lot of pieces. My general rule is that I’m only interested in things I have never heard anything like before – and we’ve got plenty of those!’

(…)

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Published in: on 9 august, 2007 at 22:45  Legg igjen en kommentar